Maris Otter – A Norfolk Heirloom Malt Variety

Brewing using the finest ingredients can create something special. Maris otter is a special base malt. Get Er Brewed work with Crisp Malt distributing their Maris Otter to breweries throughout Ireland and Home brewers across Europe.

Norfolk is one of the best locations in the world for growing malting barley, its perfectly located close to the sea which the Maris Otter crop benefits from a maritime climate that regulates the summer temperatures and provides moist air.

Tom Bambridge who farms 400 acres in North Norfolk explains; “This ensures a long, slow maturation of the barley with no intense heat”

“The other factor that makes for supurb barley is the light, sandy, free draining soil. This means the soil doesn’t hold onto nitrogen and results in a very low protein crop. We also have lots of naturally high levels of phosphate which aids in plant health”

Crisp Malt offer Maris Otter produced in both the traditional floor malting and Modern malting plants.

This consistently reliable base malt is prized all over the world for the incredibly rich and moreish ales that it helps create.

Maris Otter Malt
The Finest Crisp Malt

Furthermore, Crisp also malt a low colour extra pale version perfect for blondes and pale ales.

Available to homebrewers online:

https://www.geterbrewed.com/base-malts/

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/base-malt/

Homebrew Starter Kit Gift Ideas

Give a gift that keeps giving this year. Treat your friends and family to a Homebrew Starter Kit

Is Homebrewing Legal?

Yes!!

Legally brew and make Beer, Cider, Wine & Mead.

Has the quality of homebrew advanced?

Technology has advanced the quality of equipment and brewing ingredients. I strongly believe anyone can brew impressive beer, cider, mead & Wine

Get Er Brewed Basic Homebrew Starter kits aimed at beginners have syphon-less set ups that reduce the risk of things going wrong.

How to Select a Homebrew Starter Kit?

Firstly, set your budget because it’s important not to get distracted. Modern homebrew starter kits have developed a huge range of options to suit all budgets

Secondly, don’t over think it, homebrewing is easy just keep everything clean, follow the instructions and monitor temperature and it’ll be successful

Thirdly, If you need help ask!

In Conclusion its now possible to brew better than shop bought for a fraction of the price at home so look at this as a rewarding hobby.

The amount of active homebrewers is at a record high and continues to grow

Geterbrewed Homebrew Starter Kits

Many Craft Breweries have Homebrewing roots!

Many homebrewers started off homebrewing before progressing into a professional career in brewing. Therefore this gift has huge potential

https://www.geterbrewed.com/complete-brewing-kits/ https://www.geterbrewed.ie/complete-brewing-kits/

Need Help Selecting a Homebrew Starter Kit?

Just ask we really want to help you brew successfully, consistently and return time and time again

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment User Guide

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment

Want to get more beer out of every batch you brew? Want Microbrewery Equipment that delivers results? The answer is Brewiks but you also need to know how to use the Brewiks microbrewery equipment to its full potential.

Case Study of Brewiks Brewery;

Kevin McLaughlin has been our Head Brewery at Hillstown for over a year now. He has been able to consistently maximise output of each batch brewed to ensure we are utilising the maximum potential of the Brewiks Equipment we have.

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment; two Brewiks 500 systems
Brewiks 500

If your going to make your Brewery a success you need to maximise output, because that means more money from sales

Like the idea of packaging more beer per batch? Then checkout how Kevin uses 20% extra malt in the mash and then dilutes the batch at the whirlpool stage with extra water ensuring full fermenters.

As a result you package more beer for less labour and maximise profits. Above all its critical that you use your equipment to its full capabilities. For example on a typical brewday see below:

Brewiks Microbrewery Preparation

  • Fill kettle with required volume of water.
  • Set desired temperature on the control panel.
  • Switch on elements (setting: PID and Normal)
  • Open mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves and switch on pump at 100% to speed up heating.

I like to preheat the strike water the night before to save time on brewday. I heat to 10-15 degrees C higher than strike temp (depending on ambient temperature) it drops naturally overnight for mash in

Brewiks Mashing In

  • Ensure strike water is at desired temperature.
  • Mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves should be open.
  • Pump is on and at max power (100%)
  • Add water treatment if required.
  • Slowly add the grain (mixing manually with the mash paddle when required)
  • Check mash temperature and record mash in start time.

I always mash for 1 hour with the mixer pump on max, this ensures maximum starch conversion and prevents “hot spots”.

Brewiks Mash transfer

  • Firstly, check all valves on lauter tun are closed and false bottom grid is in place and level.
  • Turn of heating elements.
  • Connect medium hose from outlet valve to whirlpool valve.
  • Pump should still be mixing at 100%
  • Open whirlpool valve and then outlet valve.
  • Rinse down the sides of the kettle periodically during transfer to remove any remaining grain.
  • Mix until mixing arm is exposed, then close mixing outlet.
  • As the last of the mash is transferring, rinse and remaining grain down the mixing inlet hole.
  • Once transfer is complete, close outlet valve and switch off pump.
  • Rinse down kettle until the base is covered.
  • Now open the mixing outlet valve and switch on the pump at 60% for a few seconds. This will flush out any remaining grain from the mixing arm.
  • Close mixing outlet valve and open outlet valve and transfer the remaining mash.
  • Close all valves and disconnect and rinse hose.

I like to presparge before beginning transfer, just enough to cover the false bottom, this helps build and even grain bed. 

It’s very important to ensure that you continue mixing during the transfer, this will help prevent any blockages. 

If the mash is light, it is possible to close the mixing outlet intermittently for a minute or so at a time, this can reduce transfer time slightly. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Wort transfer

  • Give the mash a mix with the mash paddle and allow it to settle for 5-10 minutes.
  • Connect the water supply to the sparge heat exchanger and the sparge pipe to the mash tun to begin sparging.
  • Attach the medium hose from the bottom valve on the mash tun to the inlet valve.
  • Fit the small hose to the outlet valve and loop it into the kettle.
  • Open the bottom valve and the inlet valve, ensuring the mixing inlet is closed first.
  • Open outlet valve and throttle the mixing inlet valve open slightly for a second or two to purge any air from the pump.
  • Place a coarse hop spider in the base of the kettle and loop the small hose from the outlet into it.
  • Now with the pump at its lowest speed (60%) switch on and begin transferring.
  • Transfer slowly by switching the pump on briefly for a few minutes and then stopping.
  • Once the base of the kettle is covered, switch on the elements with temperature set to boiling.
  • Continue transferring until desired volume is achieved.
  • Begin mixing by closing outlet and inlet valves and opening mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves, switch on pump at 100%
  • Disconnect all hoses and rinse out.
  • Shovel out spent grains and remove false bottom from mash tun.

This is a vitally important stage of the brewday and shouldn’t be rushed!! 

If the transfer stalls the grain bed can be reset and the process continued. 

To shorten the time to boiling temperature I like to mix the wort in between transfers. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment Boiling

  • Continue heating on boil setting with pump on 100% until the wort temperature reaches mid to high 90s.
  • At this point switch off the pump and watch for a rolling boil to start.
  • Connect water hose to the condensing flue.
  • Record boil start time and add hops as recipe dictates.
  • Monitor boil and watch for boil overs.
  • If it looks like a boil over is likely, briefly switch off the elements and turn on the pump to mix.
  • When boil time is up, switch off elements.

If you are having issues with boil overs, you can lower the boil temperature by pressing all the F buttons (F1,F2,F3,F4) simultaneously and changing the preset boil temperature (usually between 110-120°C). This is particularly useful with high gravity recipes where boil overs are more likely. 

To get the maximum volume from each individual brew I back dilute by increasing my grain bill and by 20% and adding 20% extra water at the end of the boil. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment Whirlpooling

  • After boil connect medium hose from outlet to whirlpool inlet (again ensuring all valves on lauter tun are closed)
  • Ensure mixing inlet is open and mixing outlet is closed.
  • Open outlet valve and whirlpool valve and begin transferring with pump on at 100%
  • If you have a whirlpool hop addition, add it to the lauter tun now.
  • Once all wort is transferred, rinse any remaining wort and hop residue out of the kettle.
  • Fill base of kettle with water and clean the mixing arm the same way as at the end of the mash transfer.
  • Switch off pump, close all valves, disconnect and rinse hose.
  • Remove condenser and lid, and clean them and the kettle. Replace after.

I try to allow the wort to settle for as long as possible before moving onto the next step (20+ mins)

If you are doing a hop stand addition, simply wait until wort cools to the appropriate temp and add hops directly to the lauter tun.

Brewiks Cooling and transfer to fermentation tanks

  • Connect the short hose from the outlet valve to the hot wort inlet.
  • Attach the medium hose from the inlet valve to a bucket of clean water.
  • Fit the long hose from the cold wort outlet to a drain.
  • Open inlet and outlet valves, ensuring mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves are closed.
  • Turn on the pump at 100% and flush out pipework with the water in the bucket (topping the bucket up as it empties)
  • Add non rinse sanitiser to the bucket and loop the end of the long hose from the cold wort outlet back into the bucket.
  • Cycle the sanitising mixture for a few minutes and then switch off pump.
  • Connect the medium hose from the inlet valve to the side bottom valve.
  • Turn on the pump at 60% and run until you see wort coming from the end of the long hose.
  • Spray sanitiser on the bottom valve of the fermenter and connect long hose from cold wort outlet to it.
  • Connect a 3/8″ pipe from the vent pipe of the fermenter into a bucket of water, this will act as an airlock.
  • Connect the mains water supply into the cold water inlet connection. Using a short length of hose, loop back from the hot water outlet connection back into the kettle.
  • Now take a wort sample for testing from the lauter tun side valve.
  • Begin transfer, monitoring cold wort temperature and adjusting pump speed to get the desired temperature (higher pump speed equates to a higher transfer temperature and reversely a lower speed will lower the temperature)
  • Continue transferring, regularly checking the transfer temp and the volume of wort left in the lauter tun.
  • Monitor the sight glass until you see trub flowing then close valves
  • Disconnect all pipes and clean down.
  • Check temperature of wort in the fermentation tank is correct and pitch yeast.

I like to transfer a degree higher than the required fermentation temperature, remember it’s always easier to lower the temperature a degree or two than it is to raise it.

The brewiks comes as standard with an analogue temperature gauge on the cold wort outlet, personally I have replaced this with a digital temperature prob and I get a more precise reading and can react quicker to variations in transfer temperature.

Pressurised Brewiks Fermentation Tanks

  • Set controller to “Col” and set fermentation temperature
  • Monitor the fermentation process over the next few days and take regular samples of the gravity.
  • When gravity reaches 6 points from the target final gravity, close the airlock, natural carbonation then takes place and as a result produces a softer mouthfeel
  • Keep a close eye as the pressure increases over the next 12 hours.
  • Monitor fermentation until complete then lower the temperature to half and maintain for 24hrs.
  • Now crash cool by setting the temp to -1°C.
  • After 48hrs of crash cooling you can drop the yeast out of the bottom valve.
  • Continue conditioning, monitoring taste and test carbonation throughout. We use a taprite carbonation tester

If your interested in learning more we have brewdays once per month at our production facility and the Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment can be found here: https://www.geterbrewed.com/brewiks-equipment/

Starsan, Saniclean & PBW substitutes

At Geterbrewed we are always striving to help folk brew successfully and consistently so they return time and time again, one of the main contributing factors to brewing a bad batch at home or having a spoilt brew is because of cleaning, you would be surprised at how much a difference you will find in the quality of your brew if you are use good cleaning and sanitation protocols, this involves using the correct brewery cleaning products, so in short take cleaning seriously and the rest will be much easier.

Soak when you can, spray when you can’t! Now does it need rinsed does it not need rinsed?

Many products available now claim to be no rinse but you need to be aware that this is the case if prepared at the correct dilution rates. Hard work in terms of elbow grease will help towards ensuring a piece of brewing equipment is clean or you can use the correct chemical and water mix and if it’s got the correct dosage rate & contact time it’ll work too just without the physical effort.

If you are a brewer you will be aware how important it is to ensure regimental cleaning regimes, to aid with that it’s equally important to use a good quality range of brewing cleaning products. One such range known throughout the brewing community is 5 star chemicals, they have the brands Starsan, Saniclean and PBW, recently these products have been temporarily unavailable in Europe due to them needing REACH certification.

Thankfully Brouwland can now offer a complete alternative to the 5 star range of cleaning products and we are very pleased to be launching these products to you in the coming days, we hope to have them available for release via our homebrew website on the 11th of November.

The New Chemipro Range Alternatives to 5 Star Chemicals can be summarised below:

PBW → Wash

Star San → San

Saniclean → CIP

 Chemi pro wash

Chemipro® Wash

Chemipro WASH

Safe to use on all types of plastics and soft metals

Removes protein soil and stains, caked carbon and fatty acids

500 g, 2 kg and 10 kg packaging

Chemipro CIP

Chemipro® Cip

Chemipro CIP

Low-foaming, acidic anionic final rinse

Can be used in CIP systems

250 ml, 500 ml, 1 l and 5 l packaging

chemipro san

Chemipro® San

Chemipro SAN

High-foaming, acidic anionic final rinse

Only requires a contact time of 60 sec.

100 ml, 250 ml, 500 ml, 1 l and 5 l packaging

Chemsan Starsan substitute

 

In the meantime while we eagerly await the arrival of the full range of Chemipro products we have sourced a substitute for Starsan called Chemsan and it’s available from Monday 28th of October, checkout the technical spec below:

CHEMSAN

An acid cleaner for Brewing and Surface Sanitising

 

BENEFITS

No Rinse required when used at the recommended dilution

Self Foaming

Not Affected by Organic Materials

 

DESCRIPTION

A blend of phosphoric acid, benzenesulfonic acid and isopropanol.

A self-foaming sanitising solution

An excellent sanitizer for manual application

Not recommended on soft metals because of the acid nature of this product.

 

GENERAL USE DIRECTIONS

Dilution: 0.2%, 10ml to 5litres of water

Higher concentrations will require a potable rinse

All surfaces should be cleaned and rinsed beforehand

Minimum contact time 2minutes

The solution should remain at a pH at 3 or below to maintain proper sanitizing level.

If using the diluted solution over time, check the PH regularly using Ph papers

Hand Utensils, Tanks, Vats, Homebrew use: Scrape or pre-clean dirty surfaces. Clean all surfaces using a suitable detergent, following label directions. Rinse with potable water.

Apply diluted solution on surfaces with a cloth, mop ,brush, sponge, spray or by immersion.

After 2 minutes contact time, drain solution thoroughly.

For all applications, allow to air dry, however surfaces must remain wet for at least two minutes.

Do not rinse after Chemsan application.

 

SAFETY

Danger: Corrosive to skin and eye, contains Phosphoric Acid. Harmful if swallowed. Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing. Wear protective goggles and clothing when using. Avoid contamination of food. DO NOT MIX CHEMSAN WITH CHLORINATED CLEANERS AS CHLORINE GAS WILL RESULT. Do not use or store near heat or open flame. See label for more precautionary information.

 

FIRST AID:

For Eyes: Hold eyes open and rinse slowly and gently with water for 15-20 minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present, after the first five minutes. Then continue rinsing. Get immediate medical attention/advice advice.

If Swallowed: Get immediate medical attention/advice advice. Have person sip on a glass of water if able to swallow. Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so by the Poison Control doctor. Do not give anything to an unconscious person.

If on Skin or Clothing: Take off contaminated clothing. Rinse skin immediately with plenty of water for 15-20 minutes. Get medical attention/advice advice if needed.

If Inhaled: Move person to fresh air. If person is not breathing call an ambulance, then give artificial respiration, preferably mouth-to-mouth if possible. Get immediate medical attention/advice advice.

Simply Hops – Getting Great Beer to the People

Simply Hops Guest Post from Daniel Christmas & Emily Swann

Getting Great Beer to the People

At Simply Hops we have been thinking a lot recently about what needs to be upheld and protected within craft brewing, not only for it to continue to grow and flourish, but to an extent for it to transition to its next phase of life? We love craft brewing and we know the genie is out of the bottle now, hopefully meaning craft will be around forever. So, we have to ask these questions to make sure that as much as possible, our own business reflects the ideals of craft and supports it in to the future.

In our opinion one of the cornerstones of craft brewing is localisation; A breweries ability to bring beer styles from all over the world and make it available to the local community. It plays a massive part in the building of a brewery’s sales from its inception, continues to be part of a brand’s customer foundation as it grows beyond its own postcode. It is an essential part of the culture and tone of the craft community.

People buy from people. It is said many times, but in our experience it holds truer than ever in the craft brewing world. At Simply Hops we are making sure that across the UK, Europe and Scandinavia, we have people on the ground working with local heroes to help get the best understanding of customers’ needs. We’ve recently started working with Get Er Brewed in Ireland for exactly this reason. In Ireland more than anywhere, craft brewers are struggling with the ability to build a strong local base. Looking at the Irish Craft market actually gives us a really good insight as to why localisation is so important.

Reliable numbers are never easy to get hold of in these things. In the US, craft beer is often said to make up around 15 – 16% of the market. In the UK it’s been estimated at around 5% but still growing. In the rest of Europe, it can vary from country to country, but the overall picture is towards growth and the taking of a larger share of the market. In the whole of Ireland however, estimates are that craft beer accounts for around 3% of the total market and growth is slow. Nonetheless, when you speak to the people involved in the independent craft brewing industry in Ireland, you still get all of the passion and dedication that you get elsewhere. They see themselves as part of a bigger community and work in the same collaborative way that is pretty much expected among craft brewers. Their beer is just as thoughtfully crafted and offers the same quality and excitement to their customers. So why is the market not responding in the same way as many other places?

geterbrewed

Jonathan and Deborah Mitchell run Get Er Brewed, based in Randalstown in the North of Ireland. They have grown from supplying home-brew and wine kits initially, to now being a major distributor to the craft breweries in Ireland. As well as Simply Hops they work with Crisp Malt and Lallemand Yeasts delivering to craft brewers across Ireland. They have been concentrating recently on making sure that they are able to deliver the best quality ingredients to the customers they deal with. But they are both ambitious and the lack of growth in the market is seen as equally unnecessary and frustrating. Jonathan says “I love Irish craft brewing. The brewers I meet on a daily basis are really killing it when it comes to passion, quality and innovation. There are some things we need to catch-up on here in Ireland though, that will see the craft beer market bloom. When I go to the mainland UK and throughout Europe, I see breweries bringing in locals to their taprooms and bars. The locals love having something that is new, exciting and most importantly “theirs,” right on their doorstep. They are able to interact with the brewers and staff, and in a way that they never can with large scale breweries. It creates both passion and loyalty in the consumer, making them the perfect ambassador for the breweries as they spread the craft word to their friends. It also gives the brewery a financial boost as they are able to shift some of their volume through a short supply chain and protect their margin.” Deborah adds, “It’s all about real interactions no matter who your customer is. We have built our business on face to face communication. We have become our own brand that naturally incorporates all of the values we uphold in our business. The same holds true for the breweries.” Jonathan continues, “Licensing makes running something like a tap-room or pop-up event very time consuming or expensive. The costs of the licenses in Ireland can be eye watering, which makes setting up a tap room a non-starter. Even for pop up events, each time you have to apply to the courts to transfer licenses from already licenced premises. It makes doing these kinds of things difficult and certainly means that anything spontaneous is out of the question. The result is that the brewers can lose a very powerful marketing tool. With so much passion an energy in Irish craft brewing you can almost feel the market straining against its restraints. It’s ready to go!”

Heaney Brewery

Mal McKay is energetic and smiles easily. It gives away his love of what he does. He also sees his local market as key to his future success. He has just finished building his new brewery on his family’s farm (former home of the famous poet Seamus Heaney) and is about to begin brewing his craft beers sold under the Heaney brand. As soon as he starts speaking to us, it’s clear that he plans to overcome any obstacles in his way. His opening sentence is possibly tongue in cheek, but you get the sense he means it. “Anybody that hasn’t heard of us yet soon will. This has all come about from a love of beer, and me and friends homebrewing to make clones of the beers we love. It just went a bit too far one night when I said to my wife I wanted to put a brewery in at the farm. “Wise up” she said, which I did for a while. Then I went a bit mental and decided to do it anyway. To begin with we’re going to focus on some good everyday, everyman beers. I think a good brewery needs to be able to offer a good core range. I have good some great ideas for some big recipes down the line though. The biggest threat to me here is getting the local consumer to understand that they should be buying proper beer. We should be supporting local brewers whenever possible and that means drinkers, the publicans, the staff in the pubs, the hotels, the restaurants and the independent off-sales. They keep saying there’s no demand for the craft beer. But how can there be a demand for it in your pub if you don’t have it in your pub. I guarantee if you put it in your pub, people will buy it.”

O'Brother Brewery

O Brother Brewing in Kilcoole In the South of Ireland, is busy. The radio is loud, the keg filler is being operated at full-tilt and space is very much at a premium. It’s a similar scene that you get from many craft breweries. Fast paced, hard work designed to turn out premium beer. Barry O’Neill, one of the founding brothers (there are three) nonetheless finds time to speak to us about his view of the future. “We set up in the back-end of 2014. Just myself and my two Bro’s. We used to work part time in our Uncle’ Off-licence. We got a reputation for turning up to parties with weird and exotic beers from all over the place and it started a love of beer. We became passionate home brewers then outgrew our dad’s garage so made the leap from very diverse careers to brewers. We spent about 3 years getting the brewery together before we eventually got going here in Kilcoole. We wanted to brew what we feel is lacking in the Irish market, which is big hoppy beers in the American style. We wanted to put Irish beers on the map. In 2011 when we first started looking at this there were very few breweries that were not playing it safe. Now though, there are loads of Irish brewers doing really great things. With regards to the future we are looking at the growth of the market, or rather the lack of it. I think it’s going to be hard yards to keep making in-roads in the market now. I feel this especially when we hear our consumers saying “I got the new craft beer from brewery X” and I know that that particular brewery brews our entire annual production 8 times every day. We have to educate the consumer about the difference between a brewery like this where we have 4 people grinding it out every day because they love what they do. Compared to a brewery that spends more on one advertising campaign than we do in a year. It makes it hard for us to get in to the bars and pubs and to get taps for the people to try out beer. If we can get more locals involved with us, it helps us get that message out”

Rye River Brewery

Finally, we spoke to Bill Laukitis, Head Brewer at Rye River in Kildare just outside of Dublin. Rye River could not be described as a small brewery by any means, with an output that far exceeds that of many of the other breweries we spoke to. They are just opening a new taproom and have excellent distribution through a number of sales channels across different brands. You would expect then that Bill’s view point might be slightly different. But he is clearly an independent brewer who has the love of craft within him. He speaks proudly of “his” Irish brewhouse and the beer they make. “This is the first brewhouse manufactured in Ireland for over 100 years. We wanted to bring this type of engineering back to Ireland so we linked up with a local engineering company and the kit is working pretty well. We’re on course to brew 28 times on the 25HL system this week. We’re pretty proud of the beers we make here. 25 core beers and 30 unique special recipe beers last year. It keeps us very busy.” At this point Bill does something that many craft brewers will do when you ask them to talk openly about beer and begins to talk in-depth about the technical aspects of the water he uses (among other things). It’s great to watch a man so full of love for what he does. We suspect that at this point, Bill would love nothing better than to be teaching the world to brew craft. We do eventually get him back on track though. “Craft brewing is a community and back where I grew up in the states it’s a lot easier for a brewery to open up its doors and let everybody in. Somewhere to share their beers and get to know each other. I think making it easier for breweries to do that would help a lot in the future. It would also help with tourism. A lot of people visit Ireland to try beer. There is a famous beer or two that people come for, but it would be great if it was just as easy for them to visit the great craft breweries in the country.”

It’s quite clear then, that all of the ingredients for growth of the craft market are there. The passion and the skill are poised waiting. Irish brewers are doing all they can but what the Irish market shows us is that connection to your local market is key. It is that interaction combined with the brewing and the beer that grows the market and at Simply Hops we are hoping to see all of the brewers across Europe build ever stronger support bases. Legislation and licensing changes are just part of this. Our support as a supplier is also important and we plan to do all we can to help.

BBC Enhanced Hop Pellets now available at Geterbrewed

We are excited to launch The BBC Pure Hop Pellet™ to brewers in Ireland, we have been selling these to craft brewers for sometime but now we are able to offer them to the homebrew community also. Geterbrewed proudly represent Barth Haas / Simply hops in Ireland and we really care about the hops we sell, they are all cold stored below 4 degrees and packed in a professional way, we are really impressed with the quality of BBC Pure Enhanced Hop Pellets…

So what is a BBC Pure Hop Pellet?

It is specifically designed for high efficiency and heavy-use applications in both conventional and dry hopping applications. Developed in collaboration with Boston Beer Company, the BBC Pure Hop Pellet™ increases the yield of hop volatiles, resulting in higher aroma and flavour. It provides improved homogeneity and better storage stability compared to raw hops.

The proprietary pure hop process removes extraneous material, resulting in true hop flavour.

The BBC Pure Hop Pellet™ is produced using a finer, more uniform grind than standard Type 90 pellets. A sub-zero process – milling and sieving takes place at approx. -35°C (-31 °F) – prevents hop resins and essential oils from oxidation.

Supported by a long history of safe use in brewing, and in accordance with US FDA regulation 21 CFR 170.30(c) and 170.3(f), hop pellets are generally recognised as safe (GRAS).

Product Specifications

Description: Cylindrical pellets of approx. 6 mm (0.24 inch) diameter, milled and compressed whole hops

Consistency: A solid which normally breaks up into a powder

Colour: Typically from dark-green to olive-green (depending on variety)

Alpha-acids: Typically 4 – 16% (depending on variety and crop year; standardisation is possible)

Beta-acids: Dependent upon raw hops

Hop oils: 0.4 – 3.5 mL/100 g (depending on variety and crop year)

Moisture: 7 – 12%

Process Specifications:

Drying temperature: < 60 °C (140 °F), depending on raw hop moisture content

Milling and Sieving temperature: approx. -35 °C (-31 °F)

Pelletising temperature: < 55 °C (131 °F) Temperature of pellets after cooling: < 20 °C (68 °F)

Product Use:

As these are an enhanced hop pellet you could reduce the quantity of pellets you use or you could use the same and have more impact. Geterbrewed ran some trials using these and we reckoned you got 30% more bang for your buck in terms of hop flavour and aroma

For efficient provision of bitterness, the pellets should be added to the wort at the beginning or up to 15 minutes after the start of the boil. Utilisation of alpha-acids into beer depends on the boiling system and conditions and is normally in the range of 30% – 35%. Added late into the boil, utilisation of alpha-acids diminishes as the utilisation of the aroma improves giving a characteristic hop flavour in the beer. The quantity to be added is calculated using the alpha-acids content and the estimated utilisation. For aroma or dryhopping, the quantity to be added should preferably be calculated using the oil content of the product.

Packaging: Pellets are packed in laminated foils with an aluminum layer as a barrier against diffusion of oxygen. They are vacuum packed. The foil material used meets all food industry packaging regulations. The residual oxygen content in the foil packs is less than 2% by volume. Pack sizes are available in any quantity at Geterbrewed

Storage and Best-by Recommendation:

The BBC Pure Hop Pellet™ should be stored cold at 0 – 5°C (32 – 41 °F) and is best used within 3 years after processing. If stored at –20 °C (-4 °F) it should be used within 5 years. Foils, once opened, should be used within a few days to avoid deterioration of bitter acids and essential oils.

 

Lallemand Launch New Kolsch Yeast in Ireland with Geterbrewed

A note from our Friend Robert Percival at Lallemand brewing about an awesome new yeast product they are launching for both Craft Brewers & Home Brewers….

At Lallemand Brewing we are constantly working to provide new innovative and highly demanded brewing products. We are specifically looking for stable and consistent selected strains that will produce quality fermentations time and time again. After years of research, development and testing, we are thrilled to announce the launch of our newest Premium Yeast LalBrew® Köln.

Framed within the LalBrew® Premium Yeast product line, LalBrew® Köln has been specifically selected for its ability to produce traditional Kölsch-style beers and other ales. The character of this strain accentuates delicate hop aromas while imparting subtle fruity esters. Through expression of a beta- glucosidase enzyme, Köln can promote biotransformation and accentuate hop flavor and aroma. Colder fermentations will have little impact on flavor and aroma, while warmer fermentations will produce a more fruit-forward ester profile. Once released, LalBrew® Köln will available in 500g and 11g sachets.

Several breweries around the world have executed highly successful pilot brewing trials with LalBrew® Köln. The results are overwhelmingly positive and have generated substantial excitement, leading us to believe that this new product will be extremely well-received in the market.

As one of Lallemand Brewing’s premium brewing yeasts, LalBrew® Köln comes with Lallemand’s unmatched technical support and expertise.

If you have any questions, doubts or simply want to know more, just visit www.lallemandbrewing.com , give our Irish Distributor Geterbrewed or us a call or contact Lallemand Brewing directly via [email protected]

At Lallemand Brewing, We Brew With You.”

Lalbrew Koln Dried Kolsch Yeast

Using Hops In The Brewhouse

Using Hops In The Brewhouse

Geterbrewed have been working on hop blog posts recently to try and provide more knowledge around the use of hops. Many modern day craft brewers are going for the juice bomb affect with loads of late whirlpool hopping, hop stands at different temperatures then huge x amount per litre dry hops, in comparison to that on the opposite side of that parameter our research has showed that many traditional german breweries add 60/70% of their hops at first wort. Some brewers add hops in the mash, first wort, the kettle, the whirlpool and the fermenter, so what works best for you?

There is much more to brewing with hops than simply just working out the IBU’s when hops are added, its important to recognise how the hops will affect the finished beer.

There is multiple types of alpha acids, the main types that brewers are interested in are: Humulone, Co Hululone and Adhumulone.

The above alpha acids are isomerised in wort by heat and each are transferred into two forms, the result being six iso alpha acids (cis-iso-humulone, trans-iso-humulone, cis-iso-cohumulone, trans-iso-cohumulone, cis-iso-adhumulone and trans-iso-adhumulone)

Alpha acids aren’t really soluble in beer and aren’t bitter whereas iso-alpha acids are intensely bitter, at least four times more bitter than alpha acids. So Iso alpha acids provide bitterness, they stabilise beer foam and they inhibit the growth of bacteria.

Hop Scientists have identified that higher percentages of co-humulone produce a harsher bitterness hence the demand for hops with low amounts of co-humulone, this has to be balanced as low level co-humulone hops wouldn’t be efficient in achieving high levels of bitterness.

Co-Humulone and Humulone levels vary between 20-50% each in different hop varieties while Adhumulone will be 10-15%. These alpha acids are important for flavour stability in packaged beer. Traditional hopped beers are made up of 68% cis alpha acids (perceived bitterness) and 32% trans alpha acids (these alpha deteriorate much faster) Many factors will affect the degradation of these alpha acids but cold storage of your packaged beer will slow this down greatly.

Some brewers are starting to brew with pre isomerised hop extract, Geterbrewed recently started to sell Isohop in 1 litre format for this purpose. This acheives a 55% utilisation as apposed to 30%. Isohop contains a higher % of Cis- Isomers and are in turn more stable.

Beta acids generally are not soluble but some research has shown oxidation reactions with beta acids create halipinic acid in the boil and perceived bitterness because of its transformation. Oxidation reactions occur due to hops not being stored correctly .

Lots of variables will affect perceived bitterness levels in beer for eg some malts will add bitterness like roasted malt. It can be said that been brewed with more calcium sulphate in the water will be recognised on the taste as having a crisper hop character while those beers higher in calcium carbonate exhibit a harsher bitterness.

The temperature a beer is served at may highlight or suppress the bitterness, with colder temperatures being the suppressant. The level of polyphenols also affects the perception of bitterness.

IBU utilisation is complex to measure and results from different locations will vary greatly depending on what formula you use to calculate. Tinseth formula would be the most popular.

IBU categorisation was created to help brewers brew a beer with a consistent bitterness level. So how do they measure this? By acidifying and extracting a sample of beer with iso-octane, then take an absorbance reading at a specific wavelength with ultra violet light, this is a high tec lab test not one we as brewers can routinely carryout in the brewhouse.

The home-brew community use calculators like Brewersfriend to work out IBU’S.

There is many variable to affect the utilisation of hops, for eg change the length of the boil and the hop utilisation will change, other factors affecting utilisation include:

  • Type of hop- eg pellets are 10% more efficient than leaf and BBC enhanced t90 pellets are 30% more efficient than leaf
  • Shape/size of the kettle – how the hops move around during the boil
  • The gravity of the wort – the higher the og the lower the utilisation
  • The temperatures during the boil
  • The pH, salts & minerals in the water

Hop utilisation equals the quantity of iso alpha acids found in finished beer. Brewers can expect to lose about 50% of iso alpha acids on the hot side and a further 20% during fermentation and packaging.

Different hops require different boiling times, experimentation with blending hop varieties and splitting the addition times are best practice in our opinion to build layers of hop flavour into your beer. Longer post boil stands will result in more hop flavour, aroma and perceived bitterness.

What is a Hop used for in brewing?

Humulus Lupulus or Hops are used during the brewing process of beer to acheive many positive attributes:

  • Bitterness
  • Flavour
  • Aroma
  • Mouthfeel
  • Foaming & Lacing
  • Anti Microbial – Hops act as a natural preservative

What is hop used for in brewing

Generally hops added at the start of the boil are to achieve bitterness, hops in the middle of the boil are for flavour and hops at the end of the boil are for aroma.

Hops cones are the particular part of the plant that brewers want. Specifically the Lupulin glands which contain hard and soft resins, oils and polyphenols.

The Soft Resins contain alpha acids and beta acids, brewers use the alpha acid rating to indicate the level of bitterness. You will hear the term isomerised alpha acids, you see alpha acids only become isomerised as a result of boiling the hops in the wort.

Hop oils produce the aroma and flavour of beer, its not just about the amount of hop oils but about the composition of the hop oils. To be very technical we can use gas chromatography to examine the composition of hop oils.

Hop aroma will change, for example what we experienced recently at the 2019 Hop harvest was a very different aroma in the hop field compared to the aroma in the kiln and again different during the brewing process.

Hop oils aromas and flavours can be categorised into a wide range of sensory spectrums for eg floral, citrus, fruity and woody.

Hop Oils make up 4% of the hop cone, there is a differing range of hydrocarbons from 50-80% and a range of oxygenated hydrocarbons from 20-50% and finally less than 1% sulphur compounds.

  • Hydrocarbons are highly volatile, not very soluble and only impact the beer when added late in the boil or as a dry hop.
  • Oxygenated hydrocarbons are more soluble and aromatic, these aromas are more likely to show up in a finished beer
  • Sulphur compounds albeit in low % of the oils they can influence the aroma

There is 4 prominent Hop oils to be aware of (2-4 are more likely to survive into packaged beer)

  1. Myrcene – Monoterpene ( Green Herbaceous Resinous Aroma)
  2. Caryophyllene – Sesquiterpenes
  3. Humulene – Sesquiterpenes
  4. Farnesene – Sesquiterpenes

You also have to be aware of Biotransformations , this is when hop oils interact with the yeast – Geterbrewed have asked the hop merchants that we work with to look at creating some papers researching these biotransformations

Lianlool (a terpene which occurs naturally) is a carrier of hop aroma but actually one of many hundreds of compounds, there is alot of research ongoing , currently it isn’t just as simple as using a hop descriptor to achieve specifics aroma compounds from specific oils

Brewers have been know to add more of a specific hop variety to achieve that desired aroma profile when in fact the solution maybe to actually add a little less to allow that aroma to shine through. A strange comment you may think as Geterbrewed should be wanting to sell more hops but sometimes less is more.

Hop aroma can make you feel relaxed! Yes its a scientific fact but what is exciting for brewers when they brew with different hop varieties is that when paired with other hops the physical interactions and biotransformations with different yeast strains can create something truly impressive. You know that beer that just blows your mind, those hops that just work in harmony together.

In summary hops are used to determine the bitterness, flavour and contribute to the aroma of a beer and they play an important role in naturally preserving the beer.

Homebrewing Beer

Homebrewing Beer can be as simple or as complicated as you want to make it.

It can be said that in the home brew industry you have 3 options or different types of homebrew beer kits

  1. Isomerised Beer Kits (usually pouches or cans)
  2. Extract Beer Kits ( Partial Mash Kits)
  3. All Grain Brewing ( brewing from scratch )

Modern day homebrew beer kits and equipment can allow you to not only be frugal but you can brew better beer than shop bought. If you are a craftbeer fan you can attempt to clone your favourite beer or be adventurous and create some truly unique beer.

If you decide to start homebrewing beer and you choose to start with a basic homebrew beer kit the equipment will always be useful for all levels of brewing beer. If you try a isomerised beer kit you can still create great beers. An isomerised extract kit is usually a pouch or can of liquid malt that has isomerised hop solution in it. You are basically rehydrating the liquid malt extract and adding the yeast and fermenting the beer. Some modern beer kits also have dry hop additions that you add directly to the fermenter this creates a nice hoppy aroma.

Extract brewing also includes brewing with liquid malt but it’s a little more hands on and you need a little more equipment but household pots etc can be used to help you create a wort with steeping grains. This steeping grain or quantity of malt will bring more freshness and body to the beer. Once you create the wort by adding the steeping grains (grains/malt in a muslin/nylon bag) to warm water you add the liquid malt. The steeping grains are added to warm water in extract brewing for e.g. 67 degrees as it converts the starches in the malt to fermentable sugars which is also known as sugary wort. The lower mashing temperatures with steeping grains will create a dryer beer and higher temperatures of say 69 will produce a sweeter beer.

All Grain Brewing is brewing from scratch using water, malt, hops and yeast. I’m a massive fan of all grain brewing it creates really impressive craft beers and allows you to really immerse yourself in the hobby, the process of all grain brewing is the longest to produce with a brewday taking around 5 hours. It’s a great way to spend a day though and the results are worth it. You can buy all grain recipe kits with instructions that have the beer style and ingredients all worked out for you or you can design your own recipes from scratch

What is critical to successful brewing of beer no matter what type of beer kit you choose is cleanliness and temperature control.

Having all equipment sterilized and maintaining a constant fermentation temperature for the yeast will make for the best brewed beer.

If you need any help at all selecting a homebrew starter kit we are happy to help, we aim to be beginner friendly and remember that we want you to brew beer consistently and successfully so you return to brew more beer time and time again