Grainfather g70 Review by Lacada Brewery

Guest blog & Review from Lacada Co Operative brewery based in the North Coast of Ireland in Portrush

We’ve been very excited about the Grainfather G70 here at Lacada. We’re upgrading our nano-system and need a solution to brew about 50-55l of beer to trial new recipes. A few of us use the G30 for home brewing so the G70 could be the perfect solution. Its pricy but quality costs:-) 


Recently GETERBREWED offered us the chance to trial the G70 so we lept at the opportunity. 
With recipe ready we ordered a Fermzilla 55l for fermentation and bought a second hand fridge for temperature control, a snip at £50 from North Coast Auction Rooms.


Saturday would be brew day so we got down the brewery Friday evening to open the box, give the system a good clean and set a timer delay so the mash water would be ready Saturday morning.


On first inspection, it looks a quality machine, many of the G30 weaknesses have been resolved. A clear colourful PID, a  bottom plate filter and extra powerful pump. Connecting the device to the internet was simple and within seconds the G70  was downloading the latest firmware updates. 


With a recipe already recorded in the online Grainfather app, it was a simple process to kick off the brew day and delay temperature heating until the next morning.

Interestingly the mash/sparge volumes and estimated gravity were different to the Brewfather app but given this is a brand new product we  made the assumption that GF would be more accurate. 


Saturday morning, as planned, the mash water was up to temperature and we started to mash in. The recipe is a low abv NEIPA so the grain volume is at the low end of the G70 spec 8kg. With grain added we popped on the top plate (much easier than on the G30) connected the recirculation pipe and kicked off the mash timer.  We could hear the pump but see no liquid? Strange, it definitely worked last night…. 


Checking everything was connected and switched correctly. Maybe the filter was blocked? Removing the grain basket and lifting the very heavy G70 high enough so we could drain the liquid, we tried the pump once more and it started to work. Not sure why, but it had started to work again. Good news. With grain basket back in, we proceeded with the mash. 
The temperature for this mash is high, 70oC as we want plenty of body in the beer. The temp registered on the PID showed as being 68oC and the heater ono full blast. Within a few mins it had overshot to 73oC but minutes later it was backdown to 68oC. Theres no way the mash temp could fluctuate that much so we could only assume that the temp probe is inaccurate.


Mash complete, we sparged and moved to boil. It took over 90mins to get from 75oC to 100oC, a ridiculously long time so we can only assume the heating elements are under powered. I know similar competing products need special power connections or even two sources so not sure why Grainfather felt the heating elements on the G70 would be OK.


The counter flow chiller was excellent, a single pass for about 2 minutes recirculated back into the GF brought temps easily down to 80C for whirlpool / hopstand. It also easily chilled to pitching temp of 18C in a single pass at nearly full pump throughput into the FV.


However, again, the pump seemed to get airlocked when initially hooked up to the chiller and it took some manual lifting and tilting of the chiller and the lines to try to get it flowing again.


The bottom filter plate was very good when transferring to FV, and the bottom centre drain and bottom tap also very useful when cleaning as everything can be flushed right through and out the bottom.


The brew competed and wort transferred to the fermenter we cleaned up and reflected on the G70. Theres no doubt it looks the part, sure there’s a few questionable design decisions but its a solid professional looking instrument you’d be proud to own. 


However, the under powered heating element, inaccurate temperature measurement and the strange pump fault mean that this is not a product we’ll be buying. 


Many Thanks to Geterbrewed for allowing us to trial the G70.

Erol

The Grainfather Product can be found here: https://www.geterbrewed.com/the-grainfather-g70/

Gin botanicals for making gin at Get Er Brewed

Gin Botanicals 

There are hundreds of botanicals which can be used to flavour gin which is what makes it one of the broadest categories in spirits in terms of flavour, origin and styles. 

The most crucial botanical used, which is essential in the gin making process is Juniper Berries. Fact: Gin is derived from the word juniper! Regardless of all the different styles of gins, the one thing that they will all have in common is that they are all predominantly juniper flavoured. 

Gin Botanicals for making gin

The Coriander Seed, is nearly as common a juniper itself appearing in many gin products. Coriander has a long history of importance for both food and a perfumer’s ingredient. Depending on the distiller will depend on where the botanical is sourced from. The Coriander Seed all at once will give off a citrusy, nutty and a little spicy variety of flavour.

Angelica can be an unfamiliar major gin ingredient used with many not realising how commonly used this botanical is. Similar to Coriander, Angelica is closely related to the carrot family with the herbs which make up the Angelicus genus grow nearly everywhere in the northern hemisphere. The role of the botanical is to act as a binding agent in order to promote combining the other botanicals together to enhance the variety of flavours each one gives off.

The Lemon Peel is the most common citrus fruit used in gin, providing a distinct citrus aroma. Lemon peels, like other citrus fruit contain a large amount of limonence, the aromatic which is mainly responsible for the bright aroma associated with citrus.

When it comes to oranges, these can be divided into two sub categories- sweet and bitter. Both types of oranges can be found in gins. Typically, the peel of a Seville Orange (bitter) is used to dry and the peel of the sweet orange is used fresh.

The Orris Root, known to help hold the other fragrancies in place- a fixative in perfume for many centuries. They are left for as long as 5 years to dry, before being ground into powder, added to water and distilled. The Orris Root binds and stabilizes other flavours, resulting in being more likely to detect it by the effect it has on other ingredients.

Cardamom is another botanical becoming more common in the gin world! Its exotic aroma adds and expressive, spicy note. It is one of the most expensive spices, with very little needed to impart its strong flavour, Cardamom can be challenging to work with as its essential oils and aromatics are very volatile and degrade quickly.

Liquorice is a sweet, woody botanical which contains a natural sweetener. Liquorice root carries a unique taste with the often misconception that people assume that Liquorice root is similar to Liquorice sweets- which is in fact wrong!

Grains of paradise are rarely used outside of traditional African food cultures. The seeds have a woody, almost piney aroma, and slightly reminiscent of cardamom. 

Other important botanicals may include Lavender, which is increasingly becoming more popular in the use of some gin. As well as a fragrance, lavender is used as flavouring with many distillers normally opting to steep it in their pot at the last minute to avoid dominance over the rest of the botanicals. Fennel may be used by gin distillers to impart a liquoerice-like warmth and spice, becoming more common especially in contemporary style gins that emphasis herbal profile. As gin continues to expand in the world, new botanicals are starting to increasingly show up never before being distilled with juniper. 

We have our very own award winning Gin Distillery at Get Er Brewed called Frankie & Eileens so you can have confidence that we are supplying the finest gin botanicals available in the world

Frankie & Eileens Gin

Frankie & Eileen’s: This premium liquid is made up of a variety of 13 botanicals, left to mature in a copper still for 36 hours prior to starting the distiller process. The still (did we mention is hand-built locally with the copper sourced from Ireland) is then run low and slow to ensure the best cuts are made- as flavour is Frankie and Eileen’s top priority!

Botanicals used are Juniper, English Coriander Seed, Angelica, Lemon Peel, Irish Potato Peel and Pea Pods (which in fact work in harmony with the Macedonian Juniper Berries and Spanish fruit peels), Orris Root, Liquorice Root, Cardamom, Grains of Paradise, Cassis, Bitter Orange, Sweet Orange.

Gin Botanicals available for Craft Distilleries in bulk can be bought here:

https://www.geterbrewed.com/gin-botanicals-en/

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/gin-botanicals-en/

We have smaller quantities of luxury Gin Botanicals available in the following links:

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/luxury-gin-botanicals/

https://www.geterbrewed.com/luxury-gin-botanicals/

Blog written by Lauren Shaw our new Gin Brand Ambassador and Sales Executive for Get Er Brewed.

The Grainfather G70 at Get Er Brewed

Get Er Brewed are excited to now offer the brand new and exciting half barrel electric all in one brewing system. The Grainfather G70 is the largest Grainfather made yet, it boasts a strong and robust build quality. The unit is complete with a wort chiller.

The all in one brewing system can hold an impressive 17kg of malt and has capacity to hold 70 Litres of wort. The new conicals are in development and will be launched later this year. Trials using the system have allowed flexibility with brewing one batch and splitting over 2 or 3 fermenters allowing experimentation with different yeasts and dry hopping.

Like the original Grainfather its wifi controlled and links seamlessly to the Grainfather community app. Allowing homebrewers the flexibility to create their own recipes or browse thousands of user submitted ones and build the ingredient recipe using the Get Er Brewed recipe builder. The app allows you to start heating the strike water in advance so you can start your brewday swiftly.

Perfect for a small test plant for a brewpub, restaurant or microbrewery or homebrewers with a serious addiction to shiny

The Grainfather G70

Two stage false bottom – the conical base allows a false bottom with an inner collar to sit in the recess of the base. I’ve personally tested this with 600g’s of hops and saw a full flow through the pump. This is very, very effective.

The Grainfather g70 bottom drain is below the false bottom so there is almost no dead space.

Bespoke 3.2kWh concealed element – We’ve made the absolute most out of the power available to us. The element covers around 80% of the base and is mounted using a thermal paste, rather than braised. This moves the heat efficiently upwards, losing very little to where it’s not needed and as it’s spread in such a wide area, scorching will be very unlikely (also most solids settle on the false bottom, so won’t touch the elements anyway). Being concealed, it’s super easy to clean too.

Convenient side entry recirculation. Rather than up and over, we’ve built a port into the side of the unit which means if the pump is accidentally switched on, it will fire the wort just to the other side of the unit, rather than straight up. The recirc pipe has a push fit, so couldn’t be easier to install or remove.

Ball value for sampling/draining. This runs in line with the pump so is particularly helpful when draining the cleaning water. It fires out at a rate of knots and empties the unit in no time.

Sight glass with clean-in-place (CIP) solution. This is really useful when sparging. Rather than relying on water calculations, you can just sparge until you reach pre-boil volume. The cap can be replaced with the included hose barb so you can connect the recirc pipe and flush the sight glass while cleaning.

Rolled edge filter plates. These mean the silicone seals are no longer required. They have a really smooth finish and plates themselves feel really robust and wearing. The shape of the G70 is a little different – it’s much wider and not that much taller than the standard Grainfather so we’ve seen comparatively quick draining from the basket, and less likelihood of stuck sparges as the draining surface area is bigger.

-Safety aspects including locked in support ring, heavy duty, no slip brackets to on the grain basket and protection from knocking the ball valve open.

Lifting bar with winch lifting hook. Make no mistake, this is a 2 person lift without a winch!

Huge wort chiller. This works an absolute treat. There is a more powerful pump, a very efficient false bottom and a bigger wort chiller, so in my experience, cooling times are about the same as the 30l Grainfather, despite the volume being more than double. Due to the size, this will need to be positioned away from the G70, so longer silicone tubing is attached as standard.

Heavy duty handles on G70 body. Also handle on glass lid.

Includes dust cover and tap connections.

3 year Grainfather warranty.

Check them out in the links below, we have a pre order deal available if you want to get in touch:

The Grainfather g70 UK

https://www.geterbrewed.com/the-grainfather-g70/

The Grainfather g70 Ireland

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/the-grainfather-g70/

Maris Otter – A Norfolk Heirloom Malt Variety

Brewing using the finest ingredients can create something special. Maris otter is a special base malt. Get Er Brewed work with Crisp Malt distributing their Maris Otter to breweries throughout Ireland and Home brewers across Europe.

Norfolk is one of the best locations in the world for growing malting barley, its perfectly located close to the sea which the Maris Otter crop benefits from a maritime climate that regulates the summer temperatures and provides moist air.

Tom Bambridge who farms 400 acres in North Norfolk explains; “This ensures a long, slow maturation of the barley with no intense heat”

“The other factor that makes for supurb barley is the light, sandy, free draining soil. This means the soil doesn’t hold onto nitrogen and results in a very low protein crop. We also have lots of naturally high levels of phosphate which aids in plant health”

Crisp Malt offer Maris Otter produced in both the traditional floor malting and Modern malting plants.

This consistently reliable base malt is prized all over the world for the incredibly rich and moreish ales that it helps create.

Maris Otter Malt
The Finest Crisp Malt

Furthermore, Crisp also malt a low colour extra pale version perfect for blondes and pale ales.

Available to homebrewers online:

https://www.geterbrewed.com/base-malts/

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/base-malt/

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment User Guide

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment

Want to get more beer out of every batch you brew? Want Microbrewery Equipment that delivers results? The answer is Brewiks but you also need to know how to use the Brewiks microbrewery equipment to its full potential.

Case Study of Brewiks Brewery;

Kevin McLaughlin has been our Head Brewery at Hillstown for over a year now. He has been able to consistently maximise output of each batch brewed to ensure we are utilising the maximum potential of the Brewiks Equipment we have.

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment; two Brewiks 500 systems
Brewiks 500

If your going to make your Brewery a success you need to maximise output, because that means more money from sales

Like the idea of packaging more beer per batch? Then checkout how Kevin uses 20% extra malt in the mash and then dilutes the batch at the whirlpool stage with extra water ensuring full fermenters.

As a result you package more beer for less labour and maximise profits. Above all its critical that you use your equipment to its full capabilities. For example on a typical brewday see below:

Brewiks Microbrewery Preparation

  • Fill kettle with required volume of water.
  • Set desired temperature on the control panel.
  • Switch on elements (setting: PID and Normal)
  • Open mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves and switch on pump at 100% to speed up heating.

I like to preheat the strike water the night before to save time on brewday. I heat to 10-15 degrees C higher than strike temp (depending on ambient temperature) it drops naturally overnight for mash in

Brewiks Mashing In

  • Ensure strike water is at desired temperature.
  • Mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves should be open.
  • Pump is on and at max power (100%)
  • Add water treatment if required.
  • Slowly add the grain (mixing manually with the mash paddle when required)
  • Check mash temperature and record mash in start time.

I always mash for 1 hour with the mixer pump on max, this ensures maximum starch conversion and prevents “hot spots”.

Brewiks Mash transfer

  • Firstly, check all valves on lauter tun are closed and false bottom grid is in place and level.
  • Turn of heating elements.
  • Connect medium hose from outlet valve to whirlpool valve.
  • Pump should still be mixing at 100%
  • Open whirlpool valve and then outlet valve.
  • Rinse down the sides of the kettle periodically during transfer to remove any remaining grain.
  • Mix until mixing arm is exposed, then close mixing outlet.
  • As the last of the mash is transferring, rinse and remaining grain down the mixing inlet hole.
  • Once transfer is complete, close outlet valve and switch off pump.
  • Rinse down kettle until the base is covered.
  • Now open the mixing outlet valve and switch on the pump at 60% for a few seconds. This will flush out any remaining grain from the mixing arm.
  • Close mixing outlet valve and open outlet valve and transfer the remaining mash.
  • Close all valves and disconnect and rinse hose.

I like to presparge before beginning transfer, just enough to cover the false bottom, this helps build and even grain bed. 

It’s very important to ensure that you continue mixing during the transfer, this will help prevent any blockages. 

If the mash is light, it is possible to close the mixing outlet intermittently for a minute or so at a time, this can reduce transfer time slightly. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Wort transfer

  • Give the mash a mix with the mash paddle and allow it to settle for 5-10 minutes.
  • Connect the water supply to the sparge heat exchanger and the sparge pipe to the mash tun to begin sparging.
  • Attach the medium hose from the bottom valve on the mash tun to the inlet valve.
  • Fit the small hose to the outlet valve and loop it into the kettle.
  • Open the bottom valve and the inlet valve, ensuring the mixing inlet is closed first.
  • Open outlet valve and throttle the mixing inlet valve open slightly for a second or two to purge any air from the pump.
  • Place a coarse hop spider in the base of the kettle and loop the small hose from the outlet into it.
  • Now with the pump at its lowest speed (60%) switch on and begin transferring.
  • Transfer slowly by switching the pump on briefly for a few minutes and then stopping.
  • Once the base of the kettle is covered, switch on the elements with temperature set to boiling.
  • Continue transferring until desired volume is achieved.
  • Begin mixing by closing outlet and inlet valves and opening mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves, switch on pump at 100%
  • Disconnect all hoses and rinse out.
  • Shovel out spent grains and remove false bottom from mash tun.

This is a vitally important stage of the brewday and shouldn’t be rushed!! 

If the transfer stalls the grain bed can be reset and the process continued. 

To shorten the time to boiling temperature I like to mix the wort in between transfers. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment Boiling

  • Continue heating on boil setting with pump on 100% until the wort temperature reaches mid to high 90s.
  • At this point switch off the pump and watch for a rolling boil to start.
  • Connect water hose to the condensing flue.
  • Record boil start time and add hops as recipe dictates.
  • Monitor boil and watch for boil overs.
  • If it looks like a boil over is likely, briefly switch off the elements and turn on the pump to mix.
  • When boil time is up, switch off elements.

If you are having issues with boil overs, you can lower the boil temperature by pressing all the F buttons (F1,F2,F3,F4) simultaneously and changing the preset boil temperature (usually between 110-120°C). This is particularly useful with high gravity recipes where boil overs are more likely. 

To get the maximum volume from each individual brew I back dilute by increasing my grain bill and by 20% and adding 20% extra water at the end of the boil. 

Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment Whirlpooling

  • After boil connect medium hose from outlet to whirlpool inlet (again ensuring all valves on lauter tun are closed)
  • Ensure mixing inlet is open and mixing outlet is closed.
  • Open outlet valve and whirlpool valve and begin transferring with pump on at 100%
  • If you have a whirlpool hop addition, add it to the lauter tun now.
  • Once all wort is transferred, rinse any remaining wort and hop residue out of the kettle.
  • Fill base of kettle with water and clean the mixing arm the same way as at the end of the mash transfer.
  • Switch off pump, close all valves, disconnect and rinse hose.
  • Remove condenser and lid, and clean them and the kettle. Replace after.

I try to allow the wort to settle for as long as possible before moving onto the next step (20+ mins)

If you are doing a hop stand addition, simply wait until wort cools to the appropriate temp and add hops directly to the lauter tun.

Brewiks Cooling and transfer to fermentation tanks

  • Connect the short hose from the outlet valve to the hot wort inlet.
  • Attach the medium hose from the inlet valve to a bucket of clean water.
  • Fit the long hose from the cold wort outlet to a drain.
  • Open inlet and outlet valves, ensuring mixing inlet and mixing outlet valves are closed.
  • Turn on the pump at 100% and flush out pipework with the water in the bucket (topping the bucket up as it empties)
  • Add non rinse sanitiser to the bucket and loop the end of the long hose from the cold wort outlet back into the bucket.
  • Cycle the sanitising mixture for a few minutes and then switch off pump.
  • Connect the medium hose from the inlet valve to the side bottom valve.
  • Turn on the pump at 60% and run until you see wort coming from the end of the long hose.
  • Spray sanitiser on the bottom valve of the fermenter and connect long hose from cold wort outlet to it.
  • Connect a 3/8″ pipe from the vent pipe of the fermenter into a bucket of water, this will act as an airlock.
  • Connect the mains water supply into the cold water inlet connection. Using a short length of hose, loop back from the hot water outlet connection back into the kettle.
  • Now take a wort sample for testing from the lauter tun side valve.
  • Begin transfer, monitoring cold wort temperature and adjusting pump speed to get the desired temperature (higher pump speed equates to a higher transfer temperature and reversely a lower speed will lower the temperature)
  • Continue transferring, regularly checking the transfer temp and the volume of wort left in the lauter tun.
  • Monitor the sight glass until you see trub flowing then close valves
  • Disconnect all pipes and clean down.
  • Check temperature of wort in the fermentation tank is correct and pitch yeast.

I like to transfer a degree higher than the required fermentation temperature, remember it’s always easier to lower the temperature a degree or two than it is to raise it.

The brewiks comes as standard with an analogue temperature gauge on the cold wort outlet, personally I have replaced this with a digital temperature prob and I get a more precise reading and can react quicker to variations in transfer temperature.

Pressurised Brewiks Fermentation Tanks

  • Set controller to “Col” and set fermentation temperature
  • Monitor the fermentation process over the next few days and take regular samples of the gravity.
  • When gravity reaches 6 points from the target final gravity, close the airlock, natural carbonation then takes place and as a result produces a softer mouthfeel
  • Keep a close eye as the pressure increases over the next 12 hours.
  • Monitor fermentation until complete then lower the temperature to half and maintain for 24hrs.
  • Now crash cool by setting the temp to -1°C.
  • After 48hrs of crash cooling you can drop the yeast out of the bottom valve.
  • Continue conditioning, monitoring taste and test carbonation throughout. We use a taprite carbonation tester

If your interested in learning more we have brewdays once per month at our production facility and the Brewiks Microbrewery Equipment can be found here: https://www.geterbrewed.com/brewiks-equipment/

Starsan, Saniclean & PBW substitutes

At Geterbrewed we are always striving to help folk brew successfully and consistently so they return time and time again, one of the main contributing factors to brewing a bad batch at home or having a spoilt brew is because of cleaning, you would be surprised at how much a difference you will find in the quality of your brew if you are use good cleaning and sanitation protocols, this involves using the correct brewery cleaning products, so in short take cleaning seriously and the rest will be much easier.

Soak when you can, spray when you can’t! Now does it need rinsed does it not need rinsed?

Many products available now claim to be no rinse but you need to be aware that this is the case if prepared at the correct dilution rates. Hard work in terms of elbow grease will help towards ensuring a piece of brewing equipment is clean or you can use the correct chemical and water mix and if it’s got the correct dosage rate & contact time it’ll work too just without the physical effort.

If you are a brewer you will be aware how important it is to ensure regimental cleaning regimes, to aid with that it’s equally important to use a good quality range of brewing cleaning products. One such range known throughout the brewing community is 5 star chemicals, they have the brands Starsan, Saniclean and PBW, recently these products have been temporarily unavailable in Europe due to them needing REACH certification.

Thankfully Brouwland can now offer a complete alternative to the 5 star range of cleaning products and we are very pleased to be launching these products to you in the coming days, we hope to have them available for release via our homebrew website on the 11th of November.

The New Chemipro Range Alternatives to 5 Star Chemicals can be summarised below:

PBW → Wash

Star San → San

Saniclean → CIP

 Chemi pro wash

Chemipro® Wash

Chemipro WASH

Safe to use on all types of plastics and soft metals

Removes protein soil and stains, caked carbon and fatty acids

500 g, 2 kg and 10 kg packaging

Chemipro CIP

Chemipro® Cip

Chemipro CIP

Low-foaming, acidic anionic final rinse

Can be used in CIP systems

250 ml, 500 ml, 1 l and 5 l packaging

chemipro san

Chemipro® San

Chemipro SAN

High-foaming, acidic anionic final rinse

Only requires a contact time of 60 sec.

100 ml, 250 ml, 500 ml, 1 l and 5 l packaging

Chemsan Starsan substitute

 

In the meantime while we eagerly await the arrival of the full range of Chemipro products we have sourced a substitute for Starsan called Chemsan and it’s available from Monday 28th of October, checkout the technical spec below:

CHEMSAN

An acid cleaner for Brewing and Surface Sanitising

 

BENEFITS

No Rinse required when used at the recommended dilution

Self Foaming

Not Affected by Organic Materials

 

DESCRIPTION

A blend of phosphoric acid, benzenesulfonic acid and isopropanol.

A self-foaming sanitising solution

An excellent sanitizer for manual application

Not recommended on soft metals because of the acid nature of this product.

 

GENERAL USE DIRECTIONS

Dilution: 0.2%, 10ml to 5litres of water

Higher concentrations will require a potable rinse

All surfaces should be cleaned and rinsed beforehand

Minimum contact time 2minutes

The solution should remain at a pH at 3 or below to maintain proper sanitizing level.

If using the diluted solution over time, check the PH regularly using Ph papers

Hand Utensils, Tanks, Vats, Homebrew use: Scrape or pre-clean dirty surfaces. Clean all surfaces using a suitable detergent, following label directions. Rinse with potable water.

Apply diluted solution on surfaces with a cloth, mop ,brush, sponge, spray or by immersion.

After 2 minutes contact time, drain solution thoroughly.

For all applications, allow to air dry, however surfaces must remain wet for at least two minutes.

Do not rinse after Chemsan application.

 

SAFETY

Danger: Corrosive to skin and eye, contains Phosphoric Acid. Harmful if swallowed. Do not get in eyes, on skin or on clothing. Wear protective goggles and clothing when using. Avoid contamination of food. DO NOT MIX CHEMSAN WITH CHLORINATED CLEANERS AS CHLORINE GAS WILL RESULT. Do not use or store near heat or open flame. See label for more precautionary information.

 

FIRST AID:

For Eyes: Hold eyes open and rinse slowly and gently with water for 15-20 minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present, after the first five minutes. Then continue rinsing. Get immediate medical attention/advice advice.

If Swallowed: Get immediate medical attention/advice advice. Have person sip on a glass of water if able to swallow. Do not induce vomiting unless told to do so by the Poison Control doctor. Do not give anything to an unconscious person.

If on Skin or Clothing: Take off contaminated clothing. Rinse skin immediately with plenty of water for 15-20 minutes. Get medical attention/advice advice if needed.

If Inhaled: Move person to fresh air. If person is not breathing call an ambulance, then give artificial respiration, preferably mouth-to-mouth if possible. Get immediate medical attention/advice advice.

Rye River Brewery attending Craft Beer Rising with Geterbrewed

We have teamed up with Crisp Malt to bring a flavour of the Irish Craft Beer Scene to London for the 2019 Craft Beer Rising, honestly get tickets this is an awesome festival…

So we have 6 key customers attending and we will be pouring their beers all weekend including some special collaborations between the Irish brewers

Rye River Brewery

Rye River have been producing some amazing beers in the Irish Beer Scene for coming up on five years, we have recently been getting to know the team on a more personal level over the last year.

The Rye River team work hard, to give you an idea they produce a staggering volume of craft beer every year. 2018 seen them craft well see the pic from their twitter post below….

Decorating their beers with a huge array of awards and steering the business upwards is a real credit to all involved.

Geterbrewed proudly work with Rye River on their ingredients and we are building a longterm relationship with them, we both recognise Crisp Malt as the finest malt and we recently had the pleasure of collaborating with them focusing on the Chevallier Heritage Malt  barrel aged in virgin oak which will see two beers launched at Craft Beer Rising…

  1. Delusional Stout
  2. Caber Toss Wee Heavy

Rye River brew seasonal specials throughout the year, they have the McGargles brand and they contract brew some of the most impressive supermarket beers you will ever taste, seek out The Crafty Range (LIDL) Solas (TESCO) & Grafters (DUNNES)

Bill Laukitis their head brewer has genuinely worked his way up from entry level to leading the team. A talented and creative brewer who has technical ability working in harmony with creative flare.

Tom Cronin their MD has taken the Rye River beers into 26 countries an enviable acheivement . Focused and driven he continues to promote Irish Craft Beer on a global scale.

Join us at Craft Beer Rising and we will let the liquid do the talking, get tickets here: 

Imperial Yeast – Geterbrewed are the new Irish Distributor

Imperial Yeast

Imperial yeast geterbrewed

Organic Liquid Liquid Yeast grown in Portland, Oregan and shipped on ice to Ireland for distribution via Geterbrewed

We are always looking for innovative new product ranges to excite the brewing community and when we reached out to Imperial Yeast about becoming their Irish Distributor we felt that it was a good match so we have a huge range of their organic liquid yeast packs arriving this Friday.

As with all our yeasts they are correctly cold stored and when we ship liquid yeast we send a free ice pack to ensure that it arrives with you in optimum condition

Imperial have certified organic brewing yeast, we all know how proud a brewer can be of their beer and they want to ensure that the ingredients used are the best possible, imperial produce high quality organic yeast that is GMO free and 100% natural. The first yeast company to be certified organic and produced in an environmentally friendly way.

So what does it mean to pitch right? If you want to notice an improvement in your fermentations immediately then you need to make sure you are pitching the correct amount of yeast cells, You can’t see yeast cells with the naked eye but you can have confidence in imperial yeast that they have. There is 200 billion cells in the Imperial Yeast Pouch

You don’t need to make a starter in a 5 gallon ( 23 Litre ) batch if the gravity is below 1070

What’s the best way to open and pitch the Imperial Pitch Right home brew pouches?

  1. Store refrigerated until ready to pitch.
  2. Shake and kneed pouch to homogenize slurry.
  3. Sanitize the sealed pouch.
  4. Open and pitch entire contents into the well-aerated wort.
Checkout the extensive range of yeast strains here;

https://www.geterbrewed.com/imperial-yeasts

https://www.geterbrewed.ie/imperial-yeasts-en

The Belfast Craft Beer Festival 2018

This year well…. to summarise the weather saved the day, the sun was shining, the queues got longer and the breweries well they sold out….yes I said sold out!!

Belfast beer festival Geterbrewed

I have to say i’m pleasantly surprised by this and feel had the sun not of been shining i’m not so sure the organisers would have been back for another year.

This is the third year the event has run at Custom House Square Belfast and we had a stand at the event with our own brewery Hillstown Brewery and one of our brewers has started to cuckoo brew with us, so he brought 11 new beers under his Barrahooley brand. I’m kinda proud of what Sam achieved as he worked his nuts off on the run up to the event brewing specials for the Belfast beer crowd and they flew out all weekend. He gave up a corporate job to follow his passion in brewing.

Highlights for me were the Juniper Gin Gose from Lough Gill Brewery, the NEIPA 5 from Rascals plus Boyne Brewery & Barrahooleys Imperial Stout Offerings. I’m not a massive cider fan but I was really impressed with Mckeevers Rhubarb & Honey Cider.

My guys did a blueberry sour for Hillstown Brewery and we showed off the NEIPA we brewed with the Porterhouse brewery called Hazy Border, this was brewed during our brewing seminar and I was super pleased with the feedback.

A mention to Samuels Brewery also as I spoke to Gary, he left a job working for Tennents to try his hand at launching a brewery In Northern Ireland, this is some undertaking to be fair to him, he is contract brewing at Knockout brewery and whilst he isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel he wants to try his hand at offering beers with actual flavour here so fair play, he’s driven and I hope to see more of this happening

I enjoyed the craic on the friday night and have to say the music was cracking the food was great & the crowd was really enjoying the atmosphere so I drank a little too much on the friday and decided to work the saturday night but still had a laugh and it was great to put some faces to the names we often interact with on social channels.

Next year is booked and with the lift in the marketing and promotion this year and the success of this years event i’m sure next years will be bigger and better.

We need more support for the local craft beer scene, sadly only about 2% of beer consumption is craft beer in Northern Ireland and we need to get away from the Macro strong hold on draft beer to help the local Micro breweries grow, so if you see a beer festival promoting local craft beers go along and show the guys some support.

I have an understanding of what it takes and believe me when I say it they need your support to survive.

 

Cork vs Screw Top – Homebrew Wine packaging

Now it used to be thought that only cheap wines had a screw top enclosure and that fine wines needs a cork to allow the wine to receive a very small amount of oxygen to smooth out the tannins.

Well nowadays many fine wines are available in screw top and hence why we have started to hold large stocks of screw top wine bottles for home wine makers to use

Benefits of using a Screw top Wine Bottle?

  • Easy to open
  • No Need for a cork screw
  • Protects the wine completely from oxygen
  • Cheaper
  • No chance of floats cork pieces in a screwtop

At the end of the day fine whiskeys costing hundreds of pounds use a screw top and that isn’t an issue so why would using a screwtop on a wine bottle seem cheap?

We recommend you try the new range of screw top wine bottles , its the taste of the wine that matters so why worry about the closure, with a screw top you know its protected plus they are reusable